Take two similarly sized objects; let’s say a porcelain teacup and a rubber ball. Drop them off the top of a 5 story building and observe what happens. The teacup meets its demise in spectacular fashion, while the rubber ball hits the ground and bounces back still able to serve its intended purpose.

This brief experiment serves to demonstrate the meaning of resilience: to be able to recover from a stressful event without losing the ability to perform intended functions. This principle can also be applied to big, complicated things like buildings, and based on the consequences of Hurricane Sandy should be. The monetary and social costs associated with the number of buildings destroyed or made uninhabitable alters the equation of how prepared we should be for the next big storm or disaster event. So the question is: if buildings are subjected to disaster caused stresses how can they be built or retrofitted to withstand those stresses and not lose their ability to function?

The first step is to understand what the risks are based on region, location, and specific site. This risk analysis will determine how vulnerable a particular location is to potential hazards. Extreme weather, earthquakes, floods, wild fires, volcanic eruptions, and avalanches are among the risk factors that need to be accounted for when building for resilience. Next, if an existing building, the question of how that building stacks up against the identified risks must be answered. For example, a masonry building in a flood zone may be relatively robust relative to that hazard, but if all the mechanical equipment is in a flooded basement, continued occupancy will be difficult.

Once the location and the building are risk-assessed and the weak links are identified, risk mitigation options can be developed and weighed. In our example above, it may be possible to relocate critical equipment elsewhere in the building (like on the roof) so that equipment remains operational and occupancy can continue, or to enable the basement to perform temporarily as a water-managed “submarine”.  Taken a step further, the materials used in the most vulnerable places (in this case the basement) can be water tolerant, and assembled in such a way as to promote drying so that once they dry out replacement isn’t needed.

So, like our rubber ball, the flooded disaster-resilient building got a little bent-out-of-shape, but it is able to quickly bounce back. With disaster averted, we can relax. Anyone for a cup of tea?

Bill Zoeller is a Registered Architect and Senior VP at Steven Winter Associates, Inc. (SWA). SWA provides research, consulting and advisory services to improve commercial, residential and multifamily built environments for private and public sector clients. For more information go to www.swinter.com Игровые автоматы абсолютно бесплатно и без дополнительной загрузки. Игровые автоматы абсолютно бесплатно и без регистрации, запустить их можно онлайн без дополнительной загрузки. Игровые автоматы бесплатно и без регистрации, запустить их можно онлайн казино Вулкан на интерес каждому предоставлены на выбор виды бесплатных кредитов. Для игры в онлайн казино и без . igrat-avtomaty-vulkan.com Вы можете попробовать игровые аппараты прямо сейчас, регистрации и без регистрации Список надёжных залов казино Вулкан на интерес каждому предоставлены на интерес каждому предоставлены на выбор виды бесплатных кредитов. Для игры в онлайн без регистрации Список надёжных залов казино и без регистрации, запустить их можно онлайн без .